Event: Chinese New Year

***THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED***

 

Event:  Chinese New Year

When: Sunday 10 Feb 11am – 5pm

Where: Stowell Street (and surrounding area) Newcastle City Center

Website: http://www.newcastlegateshead.com/chinese-new-year

Price: Free

Okay so it’s not Japanese, but it’s probably the biggest Asian celebration in Newcastle so we would be silly not to promote it! 2013 is the Year of the Snake and to celebrate there will be a parade and a host of events in Chinatown.

The events are as follows;

Chinatown Map

  1. Parade, Chinese Arch, Stowell Street, From 12.30pm approx –Traditional dragon, lion and unicorn dances.
  2. Chinese Exhibitions, North East Chinese Association, Stowell Street, 12.30pm – 4pm – The North East Chinese Association presents an exhibition of Chinese costume, food, arts and crafts.
  3. Chinese Market & Fairground, Bath Lane & Thornton Square – 11am – 5pm – Funfair and stalls featuring traditional arts and crafts and Chinese food.
  4. Various Events At The Bath Lane Stage – Bath Lane11.30am: Speeches – Speeches from key representatives of the Chinese Community and Newcastle City Council from 11.30am.
    1. b.      12noon: Eye Dotting CeremonyA unique opportunity to witness the auspicious Eye Dotting Ceremony of the new Chinese Dragon as he is awoken from his slumber to the sound of firecrackers.
    2. c.       12.30pm – 5pm: Performances An exciting spectacle of performances and demonstrations, with the lion dance arriving to distribute Lucky Money at 4pm approx.
  5. Chinese Activities, The Chinese Centre, Westgate Road,11am – 5pm – Chinese zodiac, calligraphy, foods, card and calendar making, fortune telling, lucky draw and games.
  6. Children’s Marquee, Thornton Square, 11am – 5pm –Traditional Chinese arts and crafts and fun for all the family.
  7. Chinese Activities and Games, Dance City, Temple Street, 11am – 5pm – The Chinese Students and Scholars Association and Newcastle University invite you to understand the real Chinese culture; come along and take part in Chinese activities and games old and new.

You can download the brochure with all the information in here.

Film: The Ring

 

THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Film: The Ring (Ringu)  (リング)

When: Wednesday 31st October, 18:00pm

Where: Tyneside Cinema (Directions)

Website: https://www.tynesidecinema.co.uk/whats-on/films/view/the-ring

 

The votes for the North East’s favorite scary movie are in… and happily for us The Ring got the most votes!

 

The Ring is the film that kicked off the J-Horror wave of the late 90s – early 2000s. After wowing critics at film festivals the film was released in the West by Tartan Asia Extreme and became a cult classic in no time at all due to its wildly original take on the horror genre (to Western horror fans that is). In 2002 a remake followed which only brought the films notoriety to a wider audience. On the back of The Ring’s success countless Ring inspired films were made, other J-horror films were imported and Hollywood remade every Asian horror movie the could (usually with disastrous results). The Ring is a true modern horror classic and is required viewing for anyone wanting a scare this Halloween!

 

Reiko Asakawa is a young journalist with a divorced husband, Ryuji, and a son, Yoichi. Her niece, Tomoko, was recently found dead with a look of pure shock embedded in her face as if something scared her to death. Upon learning that her niece’s three friends died at the same time, too, and hearing about a disturbing videotape that is said to kill you seven days after watching it, Reiko comes into the possession of that same tape. Now, as time grows short, Reiko and Ryuji race to save their lives from impending doom and discover what the tape has to do with a tragedy-stricken volcanic island and a very strange little girl named Sadako …  (summary provided by IMDB)

 

 

Art Event: Origami Rules

THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

When: Tuesday August 14th 2012, (11.00am-15.00pm – Drop in)

Where: Great North Museum (Directions)

Price: Free!

Websitehttp://www.twmuseums.org.uk/great-north-museum/whats-on/events/origami-rules.html

 

Artist Yvette Hawkins will be showing you how to make a sheet a paper into something quite extraordinary, join her fr this drop-in paper origami workshop.

 

Origami (折り紙) is the Japanese art of paper folding, and began at some point after paper was introduced by Buddhist monks to Japan in the 6th century. The first recorded use of origami was in 1680 in a Poem by Ihara Saikaku which described the use of origami butterflies in Shinto weddings. The first known origami guide book was written in Japan in 1797, since then origami has become ingrained into Japanese culture and lore, with memorable tales of paper birds that turned into real ones becoming common children’s stories.

 

Modern origami owes much to Akira Yoshizawa’s resurgence of the art form in 1954, from there Origami has grown into a global phenomenon with increasingly complex designs forming incredible creations that baffle the mind with their ingenuity. Of course simplicity still holds strong with the paper crane remaining one of the simplest and most popular origami designs the world over.

 

 

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

 

THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

When: Thursday April 5th 2012, (10.30am-12.30pm – Drop in)

Where: Hatton Gallery, Newcastle University (Directions)

Price: Free!

Websitehttp://www.twmuseums.org.uk/hatton/

Tucked away just inside the main entrance of Newcastle University you can find the Hatton Gallery, which on the 5th of April will be holding a free drop in origami workshop with the Chinese artist Lip Lee. While this may sound intimidating, all are welcome and no prior origami experience is required!

Origami (折り紙) is the Japanese art of paper folding, and began at some point after paper was introduced by Buddhist monks to Japan in the 6th century. The first recorded use of origami was in 1680 in a Poem by Ihara Saikaku which described the use of origami butterflies in Shinto weddings. The first known origami guide book was written in Japan in 1797, since then origami has become ingrained into Japanese culture and lore, with memorable tales of paper birds that turned into real ones becoming common children’s stories.

Modern origami owes much to Akira Yoshizawa’s resurgence of the art form in 1954, from there Origami has grown into a global phenomenon with increasingly complex designs forming incredible creations that baffle the mind with their ingenuity. Of course simplicity still holds strong with the paper crane remaining one of the simplest and most popular origami designs the world over.