Geordie Japan’s 2012 Year In Review

 

 

Wow what a year, since launching on the 13th of March 2012 Geordie Japan has exploded far beyond what was ever expected of it. 2013 is set to be an exciting year for us but before we look to the future we should look back at the year that was 2012. In this review article you will find some interesting stats about the site and handily, for those of you who are new to the site, links to every article across the past year.

 

Continue reading

GCL: Japanese Festival

***THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Event: Gateshead Central Library Japanese Festival

When: October 1st – 8th

Where: Gateshead Central Library (Directions)

Website: http://www.asaplive.com/whats-on/events

Price: Varying (See Events Below)

 

Gateshead Central Library is holding an in house festival celebrating Japan consisting of art, cultural, language, and film events. To book tickets for any event please call 0191 433 8420 or email the library over at tic@gateshead.gov.uk.

 

1/10/12 – 2-4pm – Beginners Japanese Taster Session [£4 Per Ticket]

Get a flavour of Japan with these basic, beginner Japanese language taster sessions, anyone is welcome!

1/10/12 – 7-9pm – Japanese Beer and Whisky Tasting (18+) [£4 Per Ticket]

Take a journey through Japan with a tour of beer and whisky, and enjoy an authentic sushi buffet.

2/10/12 – 6-10pm – Anime Attacks Autumn Social (11+) [£3 Per Ticket]

Join us for Anime Attacks’ special Autumn get together with renowned manga artist Yishan Li. There will also be cosplay, art competitions, Japanese video game tournaments and more! From 8.30pm to 10pm there will also be a club night with live DJing from Peff, presenter of the award-winning ’We Must Warn Tokyo’ on Newcastle Student Radio.

3/10/12 – 6.30pm – Film: Adrift in Tokyo (15+) [£3 Per Ticket]

Offbeat Japanese comedy. The film follows the unusual bond that develops between a demotivated student and a debt collector for the loan shark to whom he owes money. Directed by Satoshi Miki (Turtles Swim Faster Than Expected, Instant Numa).

4/10/12 – 6.30pm – Film: Kamikaze Girls (12+) [£3 Per Ticket]

The film is based on the novel by Novala Takemoto and is about the friendship between 2 very different girls. There is sweet, frilly-dress-loving Rococo fan Momoko (Kyoko Fukada) and spitting, head butting biker chick Ichiko (Anna Tsuchiya). Directed by Tetsuya Nakashima (Confessions, Memories of Matsuko).

6/10/12 – 10am-12noon – Origami Session [£2.50 Per Ticket]

Make origami birds, boats and animals and create your own designs with visual artist Kate Eccles. Kate will teach you how to decorate your origami with Japanese symbols.

8/10/12 – 6.30-8pm – Talk: Japan, Geishas and Courtesans [£5 Per Ticket]

Enter the world of the geisha with this talk by bestselling author, Lesley Downer. In order to carry out research for her book “Geisha: The Remarkable Truth Behind The Fiction”, Lesley spent 6 months living among the geisha and gradually found herself being transformed into one of them. Consequently, she is able to give us a unique insight into this aspect of Japanese culture. Lesley is also the author of a number of fiction titles including “The Last Concubine” and her latest novel, “Across A Bridge of Dreams”. Pre-booking essential!

 

Stay tuned to Geordie Japan for more details in the coming weeks.

Art Event: Origami Rules

THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

When: Tuesday August 14th 2012, (11.00am-15.00pm – Drop in)

Where: Great North Museum (Directions)

Price: Free!

Websitehttp://www.twmuseums.org.uk/great-north-museum/whats-on/events/origami-rules.html

 

Artist Yvette Hawkins will be showing you how to make a sheet a paper into something quite extraordinary, join her fr this drop-in paper origami workshop.

 

Origami (折り紙) is the Japanese art of paper folding, and began at some point after paper was introduced by Buddhist monks to Japan in the 6th century. The first recorded use of origami was in 1680 in a Poem by Ihara Saikaku which described the use of origami butterflies in Shinto weddings. The first known origami guide book was written in Japan in 1797, since then origami has become ingrained into Japanese culture and lore, with memorable tales of paper birds that turned into real ones becoming common children’s stories.

 

Modern origami owes much to Akira Yoshizawa’s resurgence of the art form in 1954, from there Origami has grown into a global phenomenon with increasingly complex designs forming incredible creations that baffle the mind with their ingenuity. Of course simplicity still holds strong with the paper crane remaining one of the simplest and most popular origami designs the world over.

 

 

Late Shows: Origami & More

THE EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

The Late Shows: Free Origami & More

When: Saturday May 19th 2012, (7-11pm)

Where: Hatton Gallery, Newcastle University (Directions)

Price: Free!

WebsiteHatton GalleryThe Late Shows

Fancy trying a spot of late night origami? Then pop along to the Hatton Gallery on the 19th of May after 7pm and you can help to create an origami installation. While you are there you can also watch a slow motion dance, drink some relaxing and healthy drinks in the therapy bar or even try your hand at the Chinese art discipline of Tai chi.

Now in its sixth year The Late Rooms main objective is to encourage people to visit museums and galleries that they may not have visited before by opening up spaces after dark for a weekend. The multitude of venues that take part in The Late Rooms means that you can plan your own cultural crawl across the city. Find the full details here.

Origami (折り紙) is the Japanese art of paper folding, and began at some point after paper was introduced by Buddhist monks to Japan in the 6th century. The first recorded use of origami was in 1680 in a Poem by Ihara Saikaku which described the use of origami butterflies in Shinto weddings. The first known origami guide book was written in Japan in 1797 and origami became ingrained into Japanese culture and lore, with memorable tales of paper birds that turned into real ones becoming common children’s stories.

Modern origami owes much to Akira Yoshizawa’s resurgence of the art form in 1954, from there Origami has grown into a global phenomenon with increasingly complex designs forming incredible creations that baffle the mind with their ingenuity. Of course simplicity still holds strong with the paper crane remaining one of the simplest and most popular origami designs the world over.

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

 

THIS EVENT HAS NOW PASSED

 

Art Event: Free Origami Workshop

When: Thursday April 5th 2012, (10.30am-12.30pm – Drop in)

Where: Hatton Gallery, Newcastle University (Directions)

Price: Free!

Websitehttp://www.twmuseums.org.uk/hatton/

Tucked away just inside the main entrance of Newcastle University you can find the Hatton Gallery, which on the 5th of April will be holding a free drop in origami workshop with the Chinese artist Lip Lee. While this may sound intimidating, all are welcome and no prior origami experience is required!

Origami (折り紙) is the Japanese art of paper folding, and began at some point after paper was introduced by Buddhist monks to Japan in the 6th century. The first recorded use of origami was in 1680 in a Poem by Ihara Saikaku which described the use of origami butterflies in Shinto weddings. The first known origami guide book was written in Japan in 1797, since then origami has become ingrained into Japanese culture and lore, with memorable tales of paper birds that turned into real ones becoming common children’s stories.

Modern origami owes much to Akira Yoshizawa’s resurgence of the art form in 1954, from there Origami has grown into a global phenomenon with increasingly complex designs forming incredible creations that baffle the mind with their ingenuity. Of course simplicity still holds strong with the paper crane remaining one of the simplest and most popular origami designs the world over.